Wednesday, October 07, 2009

Sheikh or Sycophant? Sayyid Tantawi is a disgrace

If there are any doubts of the extent of decay at Al-Azhar, they can be put to rest as "Grand Imam" Sayyid Tantawi attempts to ban the niqab. Apparently this obnoxious creature has nothing better to do then humilate a young niqabi woman in school. The timing gives it away. Why is Tantawi making such a fuss over niqab when Muslim woman are being singled out by European racists and secular fascists(at the behest of their Judeofascist overlords) for persecution for the way they dress? Is it coincidence or merely a government(which itself is a puppet regime receiving instructions from its masters in the usual suspects) appointed jester staying true to form? Not surprisingly the pro-regressives have voiced their support by latching onto this outrage like flies on a turd eg- Tarek "T-Fat" Fatah and his opportunist MCC cronies. This is the same "scholar" who practically supported the draconian ban on hijab by the French. Doesn't he look adorable shaking "israeli" war criminal Perez' hand? Ofcourse he later claimed not to have known who he was shaking hands with...
Don't hold your breath waiting for Al-Azhar's scholars for dollars to say a word against the wildly unpopular Egyptian puppet client regime. Attempts to outlaw hijab, niqabs, beards and whatever else are going fail, you can bet your matza balls on it. What ought to be banned are bogus Ulama and their controllers. In conclusion I would love to see sister Yvonne Ridley let Tantawi have it with a frying pan she promised not too long ago.

6 comments:

George Carty said...

If the Muslim Brotherhood (or any other Islamists) overthrew the Mubarak dictatorship, what would they do?

Egypt is dependent on American handouts of food, remember!

Ibn said...

Asalamulakym,

Brother please more research and less rant, check out my blog post:

http://islamicarchives.wordpress.com/2009/10/09/the-real-story-behind-al-azhar-and-the-niqab-ban/

DrMaxtor said...

@George,

Egypt doesn't need handouts, it's run by a corrupt US client regime which has gobbled up the wealth of the nation while keeping it underdeveloped.
They would be far better off without American aid which is essentially part of the package of keeping "peace" with "israel" while keeping the Mubarak regime in power.
I don't know what the MB(I don't recognize terms like "islamists") would do, but I believe they would do better then Mubarak's cronies.

@Ibn
Waliakum Asalam,

Jazaks for the link but I stand by what I said. The timing of this whole manufactured niqab fiasco could not come at a worse time, right when European Islamophobes are trying to ban it. I mean really, does this moron have nothing better to focus on then niqab? It's a non-issue.
Keep in mind that Tantawi also lent support to France's hijab ban. Certainly not what I would expect from a "grand imam" from Al-Azhar, even though its a government institution now.

Ibn said...

@George, I think American will be needing handouts with their trillion dollar debts
:p

George Carty said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
George Carty said...

The massively US debt is due to free-trade dogma (which allows vast quantities of cheap chinese goods to flood in) and vast consumption of foreign oil.

It could solve its problem by putting heavy taxes on goods imported from cheap-labour countries, replacing its coal-fired power stations with nuclear ones and using the Fischer-Tropsch process to make oil from the coal thus saved, thus replacing imported oil.

While America's problems are primarily political (institutionalized corruption at the top and anti-nuclear activism at the bottom), Egypt's problems are far more fundamental. It is grossly overpopulated (hence the need for food aid) and has few resources with which to develop industry.

Yes, Egypt is suffering from a huge corrupt bureaucracy, but that isn't because of what America or any other foreign country is doing currently. It results from the way British colonial rule in the past warped Egyptian culture, such that now most Egyptian parents aspire for their children to be civil servants when they grow up.